History of Hopemont, the Hunt-Morgan House

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The House

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Completed in 1814 for John Wesley Hunt, Hopemont stands as a reminder of early-19th century Lexington when the city was known as "The Athens of the West." The house, situated on the southwestern corner of Gratz Park, is in the Federal style and exhibits elegant proportions and remarkable craftsmanship. Hopemont's entryway, perhaps its most striking feature, is flanked by leaded side lights and topped by a large, leaded elliptical fanlight. A Palladian window centered above the entryway punctuates the primary façade at the second level. In 1955, The Foundation for the Preservation of Historic Lexington and Fayette County, which later became the Blue Grass Trust for Historic Preservation, was formed to save the house from impending demolition. The organization restored the dwelling to its 1814 appearance and now operates it as a museum and event rental space.

Hopemont, before being returned to its 1814 exterior

Hopemont, before being returned to its 1814 exterior

The house museum offers a tangible link to the past, through which visitors are able to learn about the highs and lows of Lexington's history. The museum's collection of early Kentucky furniture, antique porcelain, and 19th century paintings conveys the status and tastes of the Hunt and Morgan families. Hopemont's rooms are furnished with articles of the period as well as those owned by the families. The Alexander T. Hunt Civil War Museum, located on the second floor, features an extensive collection of Civil War relics and memorabilia.


The Hunt-Morgan Family

Click to View Family Tree

Click to View Family Tree

The Hunt-Morgan family of Central Kentucky ranks as one of the region's most historic, producing the first millionaire west of the Allegheny Mountains, a Civil War brigadier general, and Kentucky’s first Nobel Prize winner.

During the early history of the nation, John Wesley Hunt became a leading landowner and businessman in Kentucky and one of the wealthiest men in the western part of the country. His business empire included interests in banking, horse breeding, agriculture, and hemp manufacturing. Among his business associates were Henry Clay and John Jacob Astor.


The Alexander T. Hunt Civil War Museum

The Alexander T. Hunt Civil War Museum, located on the second floor of Hopemont, features an extensive collection of Civil War relics and memorabilia for educational purposes.